IN THE NEWS
Inside View - February 2019

In This Issue

  • CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IS AMERICA’S NUMBER ONE KILLER. SO HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOU’RE AT RISK?
  • COLUMBIA BASIN IMAGING IS NOW INLAND IMAGING
  • LUNGVIEW: TRACKING OUTCOMES – IMPROVING CARE
  • INLAND IMAGING INTRODUCES RAPID: THE NEW STANDARD FOR ADVANCED STROKE IMAGING

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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IS AMERICA’S NUMBER ONE KILLER. SO HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOU’RE AT RISK?

February 2019 — More Americans die of heart disease than all types of cancer combined.
58 million Americans have one or more forms of cardiovascular disease, making coronary artery disease the number one killer of men and women in the United States. Yet, preventative exams that can assess and identify risk for cardiovascular disease are often overlooked.

February is American Heart Month and Inland Imaging has decided to offer a special promotion for a screening exam that aids in the early detection of heart disease: a CT coronary calcium scoring exam for $150—during the entire month of February. Exams must be scheduled no later February 28, 2019, but may be performed later.

A CT coronary calcium scoring exam is a 15-minute screening study, which measures the presence, location and extent of calcified plaque in the coronary arteries. It is a quick, non-invasive exam that assesses an individual’s risk for heart attack in the near term.

“Heart disease claims the lives of far too many people in this country. With more than two million heart attacks and strokes a year, just about all of us have been touched by someone with heart disease,” said Angela Steinbach CT manager at Inland Imaging. “We want to bring attention to this issue locally and make sure patients know there is a way to assess risk and identify indications of heart disease earlier rather than later.”

Calcified plaque results when there is a build-up of fat and other substances under the inner layer of the artery. This material can harden which signals the presence of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), a disease of the vessel wall. People with this disease have an increased risk for heart attacks. Because calcium is a marker of CAD, the amount of calcium detected on a cardiac CT scan can be a helpful predictive tool. Your doctor can use the calcium score results to evaluate the risk for future coronary artery disease.

“We are really looking to encourage prevention not just detection of disease,” said Kathleen Wilson, Inland Imaging chief operations officer. “We want to help our community in their overall wellness plan.”

To schedule an exam, patients must have an order from a referring physician, must not have any current symptoms of heart disease and must have one significant risk factor including: male 40-70 years or female 45-75 years, family history of cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, history of smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and high stress levels.

COLUMBIA BASIN IMAGING IS NOW INLAND IMAGING

JANUARY 2019 — CBI Radiology recently joined forces with Inland Imaging, expanding radiology services within the region and adding to our professional radiology group that currently provides services across Washington State and Western Montana. The new organization forms one of the largest professional radiology groups in the Western U.S. and is dedicated to providing the fast, accurate and timely answers that patients and their physicians need to guide their care — both today and in the years ahead.

LUNGVIEW: TRACKING OUTCOMES – IMPROVING CARE

October 2018 — Inland Imaging’s low dose CT lung cancer screening program is designed to follow patients with a long history of smoking or other lung cancer risk factors over time to catch potential lung cancer early, when it’s easier to treat.

Recently, Inland Imaging launched LungView — a comprehensive tracking and reporting system dedicated to the management of our Lung Cancer Screening program.

The LungView screening information system is backed by twenty-five years of experience in breast imaging tracking and reporting, and a collaboration with major cancer centers and leading radiologists. LungView automatically captures information such as recommendations for followup so our team can work with the patient’s provider to stay ahead of changes in their lungs.

The LungView patient experience helps Inland Imaging stay in touch with our patients over time to keep them engaged, informed and involved throughout the continuum of their care.

INLAND IMAGING INTRODUCES RAPID: THE NEW STANDARD FOR ADVANCED STROKE IMAGING

Inland Imaging is joining Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and more than 575 stroke centers in 22 countries around the world by implementing the RAPID software platform to support diagnostic imaging and assessment for stroke patients.

RAPID technology assists physicians in the analysis of brain images using automated tools currently used in assessing more than 85,000 stroke cases per year.

The software provides an intuitive and easily interpretable real-time view of the brain, so physicians can more quickly and precisely determine a patient’s condition, allowing providers to recommend the best possible treatment options.

With the implementation of RAPID’s proven software tools Inland Imaging’s specialized neuroradiologists can identify stroke in patients more easily and accurately than ever before. RAPID will also be launched at Providence Holy Family Hospital later this year.

Inside View - Fall 2018

In This Issue

  • PROSTATE MRI MAY DETECT MORE EARLY STAGE CANCERS
  • CONTRAST REACTION — TRAINING PUTS PATIENT SAFETY FRONT AND CENTER.
  • WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BREAST DENSITY: EARLY DETECTION BEGINS WITH MAMMOGRAPHY — THE ONLY SCREENING TOOL PROVEN TO REDUCE BREAST CANCER DEATHS.
  • WE’RE GROWING IN THE SPOKANE VALLEY

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WE’RE GROWING IN THE SPOKANE VALLEY

December 2018 — Our imaging center at the Providence Medical Park in Spokane Valley is in the process of receiving some significant technology upgrades, not available anywhere else in the valley, in order to better serve the patients and health care providers in this
growing area.

The improvements include the installation of a new 80 slice CT scanner and a state of the art, wide-bore, 3T (Tesla) MRI scanner that will be installed in early December.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BREAST DENSITY: EARLY DETECTION BEGINS WITH MAMMOGRAPHY — THE ONLY SCREENING TOOL PROVEN TO REDUCE BREAST CANCER DEATHS.

November 2018 — What is Breast Density?

Breast density refers to how your breast appears on a mammogram and NOT the way it feels or its external appearance. Breasts are primarily made up of fat and fibroglandular tissue, which includes the network of glands and ducts that produce and transport milk to the nipple for breast feeding. The more fibroglandular tissue you have compared to fat, the denser your breast will appear on the mammogram. Breast density tends to decrease gradually with age, particularly around the time of menopause. Breast density is also influenced by other factors, such as weight gain/loss and certain pharmaceutical drugs.

Why is Breast Density Important?
Breast density is perfectly normal. However, high breast density is a risk factor for developing cancer, similar to family history. Breast density also plays a significant role in the ability to detect early breast cancer, because it can make it more difficult for radiologists to spot a cancer on your mammogram. Dense tissue appears white on a mammogram and many cancers also appear as white. The denser your breasts, the whiter your mammogram will look. Imagine trying to find a snowball in a snowstorm. As a result, mammograms are less accurate for women with dense breasts.

Will I Need an Additional Screening Test if I Have Dense Breasts?
We know that breast density reduces the ability to detect cancers on mammography. Breast density assessment is used to help identify women for whom the mammogram may not be enough and who may benefit from additional screening, such as breast tomosynthesis (3D mammography), whole breast ultrasound, breast MRI, or molecular breast imaging. With consistent assessment of breast density, your doctor can confidently recommend additional screening, as needed.

What Should I Do?
If you have dense breasts, talk to your doctor. Together, you can decide which, if any, additional screening tests may be right for you. Discuss your medical and family history and any other factors that might increase your risk of developing breast cancer.
Even if you are at low risk, and have entirely fatty breasts, you should still get an annual mammogram starting at age 40 to assure you have the best chance when it comes to early breast cancer detection and treatment.

CONTRAST REACTION — TRAINING PUTS PATIENT SAFETY FRONT AND CENTER.

November 2018 — At Inland Imaging, ensuring patient safety is an essential cornerstone in our pursuit to deliver Answers You Can Trust, and Care You Can Count On.
Today, nearly half of the approximately 76 million CT and 34 million MRI exams performed each year include the use of intravenous contrast agents. Contrast agents are generally injected and
eliminated from the body without any side effects or complications.

We know that a small percentage of patients may experience reactions to contrast agents. The vast majority of reactions are quite mild and resolve quickly, such as hives or a rash, but some can be potentially serious. The occurrence of these sorts of reactions is low for both CT and MR imaging. Since reactions sometimes do occur, rapid evaluation and treatment of them requires well-trained personnel and appropriate, readily available equipment and medications.
Right Assessment, Right Tools, Right Treatment.

Identifying patients likely to be prone to a reaction to contrast agents is done before these examinations are performed, but when an unexpected adverse event arises, knowing the types of reactions that can occur and delivering prompt, appropriate treatment are critical.
To that end, Inland Imaging radiologists Dr. Julie Kaczmark, Dr. Robin Hines and Dr. Sadaf Zaidi have created a hands-on training program, including the production of training videos to help provide instruction for each of our technologists, nurses, and physicians to help them stay at the top of their games when it comes to assessing and treating contrast reactions.

The videos walk viewers through a series of typical contrast reaction scenarios introducing them to the symptoms and steps necessary to make a proper diagnosis and deliver the right treatment in a timely and appropriate manner. The videos, shot at Sacred Heart Medical Center’s Dr. James Mounsey Clinical Simulation Lab, focus on teamwork and feature scenarios that each individual may encounter in actual practice. The Sim Lab allows health care professionals to practice their technical skills on high-tech robotic mannequins before treating actual patients. The mannequins are able to produce vital signs, show symptoms, and reply to questions (with a little help from the lab’s professional staff) so that the individuals being trained can assess each scenario and determine what steps, including the administration of drugs, should happen next.

PROSTATE MRI MAY DETECT MORE EARLY STAGE CANCERS

October 2018 — According to a study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), before a prostate biopsy is more likely to find early stage cancers than a standard ultrasound guided biopsy.
Five hundred men with test results indicating the possibility of prostate cancer participated in the trial. 28 percent of the participants had MRI results that detected no prostate cancer, so they did not undergo a biopsy. Prostate cancer was detected in 38 percent of the men who received an MRI-targeted biopsy, as compared with 26 percent from the
group who received a standard ultrasound
guided biopsy.

Using an MRI to identify suspected cancer in the prostate and performing a prostate biopsy targeted to the MRI information, leads to more cancers being diagnosed. Early detection can mean earlier and more effective treatment for men facing prostate cancer. To learn more, ask your primary care provider if a pre-biopsy MRI scan of the prostate might be right for you.